vintageanchorbooks:

"Bored" by Margaret Atwood "All those times I was boredout of my mind. Holding the logwhile he sawed it. Holdingthe string while he measured, boards,distances between things, or poundedstakes into the ground for rows and rowsof lettuces and beets, which I then (bored)weeded. Or sat in the backof the car, or sat still in boats,sat, sat, while at the prow, stern, wheelhe drove, steered, paddled. Itwasn’t even boredom, it was looking,looking hard and up close at the smalldetails. Myopia. The worn gunwales,the intricate twill of the seatcover. The acid crumbs of loam, the granularpink rock, its igneous veins, the sea-fansof dry moss, the blackish and then the grayingbristles on the back of his neck.Sometimes he would whistle, sometimesI would. The boring rhythm of doingthings over and over, carryingthe wood, dryingthe dishes. Such minutiae. It’s whatthe animals spend most of their time at,ferrying the sand, grain by grain, from their tunnels,shuffling the leaves in their burrows. He pointedsuch things out, and I would lookat the whorled texture of his square finger, earth underthe nail. Why do I remember it as sunnierall the time then, although it more oftenrained, and more birdsong?I could hardly wait to getthe hell out of there toanywhere else. Perhaps thoughboredom is happier. It is for dogs orgroundhogs. Now I wouldn’t be bored.Now I would know too much.Now I would know.”

vintageanchorbooks:

"Bored" by Margaret Atwood

"All those times I was bored
out of my mind. Holding the log
while he sawed it. Holding
the string while he measured, boards,
distances between things, or pounded
stakes into the ground for rows and rows
of lettuces and beets, which I then (bored)
weeded. Or sat in the back
of the car, or sat still in boats,
sat, sat, while at the prow, stern, wheel
he drove, steered, paddled. It
wasn’t even boredom, it was looking,
looking hard and up close at the small
details. Myopia. The worn gunwales,
the intricate twill of the seat
cover. The acid crumbs of loam, the granular
pink rock, its igneous veins, the sea-fans
of dry moss, the blackish and then the graying
bristles on the back of his neck.
Sometimes he would whistle, sometimes
I would. The boring rhythm of doing
things over and over, carrying
the wood, drying
the dishes. Such minutiae. It’s what
the animals spend most of their time at,
ferrying the sand, grain by grain, from their tunnels,
shuffling the leaves in their burrows. He pointed
such things out, and I would look
at the whorled texture of his square finger, earth under
the nail. Why do I remember it as sunnier
all the time then, although it more often
rained, and more birdsong?
I could hardly wait to get
the hell out of there to
anywhere else. Perhaps though
boredom is happier. It is for dogs or
groundhogs. Now I wouldn’t be bored.
Now I would know too much.
Now I would know.”

There is no shame in being hungry for another person. There is no shame in wanting very much to share your life with somebody.
— Augusten Burroughs  (via rlyrlyugly)
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s books. I only have three as of the moment and still looking copies of his other books :)

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s books. I only have three as of the moment and still looking copies of his other books :)

Some of my summer reads.
Ninotchka Rosca’s State of War
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise
Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice
Pearl S. Buck’s The Good Earth
Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway
Ursula Hegi’s Stones from the River
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night
Gina Apostol’s The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata

Some of my summer reads.

Ninotchka Rosca’s State of War

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice

Pearl S. Buck’s The Good Earth

Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway

Ursula Hegi’s Stones from the River

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night

Gina Apostol’s The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata

"Give a girl the right shoes, and she can conquer the world." - Marilyn Monroe

books0977:

Portrait of Ziegfeld Girl, Avonne Taylor, posing with a copy of The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám.  Photo by Edward Thayer Monroe, 1923.
Taylor (American, 1899-1992) was also an actress with MGM, known for My Best Girl (1927) and Honor Among Lovers (1931).

books0977:

Portrait of Ziegfeld Girl, Avonne Taylor, posing with a copy of The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám.  Photo by Edward Thayer Monroe, 1923.

Taylor (American, 1899-1992) was also an actress with MGM, known for My Best Girl (1927) and Honor Among Lovers (1931).

I am an addicted to books. For me, it’s not only about it smelling or how much I appreciate this feeling when I run my fingers through the pages, but shapes as well, because there’s nothing more beautiful and delightful than books on shelves.
m-orelle (via m-orelle)

amandaonwriting:

Literary Quote Cocktail Plate and Coaster Sets, Dorothy Parker from Restoration Hardware

For what it’s worth: it’s never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you find that you’re not, I hope you have the strength to start all over again.
— F. Scott Fitzgerald   (via hefuckin)
xhezzi:

“to change art destroy ego” by ben vautier

xhezzi:

“to change art destroy ego” by ben vautier

Your books changed my life. Thank you, Gabriel Garcia Marquez! The literary world mourns for you.